District Sports 2018

May 22nd, 2018

The Hawks and Owls took part in the annual District Sports event against other local schools. Everyone competed in a variety of track and field events including sprints, relays, long jump, triple jump and speed bounce. The weather was lovely and everyone enjoyed competing against other schools as well as trying to improve their personal bests. Once the results have been collated we will find out if anyone has qualified for Area Sports.

A full gallery of pictures is available on the school website.

Determination!

The Team!

Swimming Gala

March 26th, 2018

The swimming team took part in the Small Schools Swimming Gala. Everyone enjoyed applying their swimming skills to a competitive situation and represented the school really well. Superb levels of determination and perseverance were demonstrated by the whole team who also behaved brilliantly. Well done to Anna and Amelie for reaching the finals of their races.

Nature Quiz- Round 1 Winners! (Just!)

March 23rd, 2018

Some of the Owls who have regularly attended Nature Club this term have represented the school in the Gloucestershire Nature Quiz. It was a very close and tense competition which kept the Hawks on the edge of their seats throughout. Over 5 rounds, both teams finished on 28 points meaning that there had to be a tie-breaker. However, they also tied the tie-breaker! Therefore, there was a count-back in the specimen round to decide the winners. Luckily this had been a very strong round for the Avening team and they have advanced to the next round! Well done team and Mrs Amos for all their hard work in Nature Club.

Sport Relief

March 23rd, 2018

Everyone had fun taking part in our Sport Relief Step Challenge. There were skipping steps, sidesteps, jumping steps, backward steps and silly steps!

There is a full gallery of pictures on the school website.

Backward Steps

Jumping Steps

Silly Steps

Residential at Marchants Hill

March 18th, 2018

The Owls have enjoyed a fantastic residential at Marchants Hill where they had the opportunity to learn new skills while developing their ability to show courage and perseverance.

After arriving, they met their PGL leader, Conor, who showed them around and played games on the field. Once they had eaten lunch, they took part in orienteering and abseiling. Orienteering around the woods taught everyone some important map reading skill which they were able to use in a competition to get as many stamps as possible. A lot of energy was used in getting between the points! Abseiling presented a different set of challenges. After clambering into the harnesses, there was a climb of four flights of stairs to get to the top of the tower. First of all, everyone had to engage to learn the skills and techniques required to abseil safely. Then a huge amount of courage was required to stand on the edge and lean back into thin air! There were some very wobbly legs at the top but pupils were able to overcome their fears and take a risk. They were really proud of themselves when they reached the bottom and took confidence from their success. Several pupils took it a step further and even though they did not complete the abseil on their first attempt they persevered, showed even more courage and completed the challenge on their second go. This was a fantastic achievement.

A delicious meal was followed by a campfire in the woods. Everyone dressed in their warm clothes and trekked down into the valley, deep within the woods, where they gathered around the campfire. The PGL leaders taught them lots of new songs, played games and told stories to keep everyone entertained until they were ready for bed.

After a good nights sleep, day two presented the challenge of archery, fencing, trapeze and climbing. Archery and fencing gave everyone chance to learn new skills and develop on ones they had learnt in school. Climbing allowed everyone to learn belay skills (knuckles, pocket, reach around, lock it) as well as take on the climbing wall. Everyone had to trust their belay team while finding the best route up the wall and getting as high as they could. It was really pleasing to see so many pupils reaching their personal best on their second go. The trapeze was a real test of courage as you first had to climb to the top of a wobbly pole. Then there was the leap into the air to reach the target which made everyone overcome their nerves!

Once everyone had eaten well, there was the challenge of getting a water bomb from the top of a tower to the ground safely. There were many collaboration skills on show as the pupils worked in groups to create a design. Motivation was increased when Conor promised any group that accomplished the challenge could pelt him with the water bombs! There were some very creative designs on show as they thought about solving the problem. There creations were then put to the test as Conor threw them from the top of the tower with a variety of results. Some water bombs did not make it but two groups were successful, much to Conor’s annoyance!

Another nights sleep resulted in the final day of the residential. Jacob’s ladder allowed everyone to apply their belay skills in a new task and everyone had to work together to get their group as high as possible. Lots of problem skills were required as well as a healthy dose of perseverance, especially after a sudden downpour including hail! The weather only increased the challenge of the Challenge Course which was full of mud and puddles. Everyone enjoyed overcoming the obstacles and it was really pleasing to see pupils support each other to get the whole team around the course. Nobody finished the course without becoming covered in mud from head to toe! A warm shower was a welcome end to the events and there was definitely a sound of snoring on the coach journey home!

All of the pupils should be very proud of their achievements on the residential. Everyone overcame their fears and showed courage to take risks which gave them more confidence in  their own ability to achieve things they did not think were possible. They worked really well to collaborate in competing the tasks and supporting each other to overcome their fears. A real team effort! They also learnt many skills in becoming more independent as they had to organise their rooms and make sure they kept all of their belongings together. Organisation and preparation were needed to make sure they had everything they needed for the different activities giving them independent learning skills they will be able to transfer back to the classroom. Their behaviour was excellent, a credit to the school, and they all developed their ability to respect each other and their instructors. Well done Owls!

A full gallery of pictures are on the school website.

Abseiling

Archery

Challenge Course

Climbing

Fencing

Jacob’s Ladder

Trapeze

Singing around the campfire

Our visit to Gigg Mill

September 28th, 2016

On 28th September, we visited Gigg Mill in Nailsworth as part of our topic – Industry: work, rest and play in and around Avening. We visited the Black Country Museum last week and it was really interesting to learn about the industry in that area around the Victorian era. However, we wanted to know a bit more about the industry in our local area back then, so a visit to a mill was an obvious choice!

Instead of going by coach, I decided (much to the delight of the Owls!) that it would be really useful to walk to the mill. This allowed us to really get an insight into how it would’ve felt and what it would’ve been like for the adults (and children!) having to walk to work during the Victorian era. We all had coats and wellies to make sure we didn’t get wet or too muddy. This was a bit of a luxury though, as we know that people wouldn’t have had this kind of protective clothing during the Victoria era! Here are a few pictures of our journey:

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When we arrived (and after we’d had a rest!), we were shown into the mill where there was a variety of machinery – both wooden and metal. Robin and Jane, our Stroud Textile Trust volunteers, showed us 2 of the main jobs workers would’ve done in the Victorian era: spinning and weaving.

Weaving:

First we were shown a basic wooden loom and we were allowed to have a go on it. Some children were moving the levers, some were ‘passing the baton’ and one was ‘beating’. The others in the group would shout the numbers needed for the pattern and the children would get to work on the process.

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Spinning:

First we were shown how the wool would have been sheared off in the Victorian era – it wasn’t anywhere near as quick or as easy as the electric clipped we have today! We then looked at how the wool would be brushed to become straight fibres ready to spin. The process is called carding and it was great for getting rid of knots! We then had a go at hand-spinning a piece of wool. Some of us were better than others! Then we moved on to wooden spindles, which would work by sending the spin up through the wool and ended up with the wool being tightly spun. Finally, we all had a go on the spinning wheel, the next development in wool spinning. This was tricky to get the hang of, but much easier and quicker than a spindle.

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Finally, we had a look at some of the developments made in weaving during the industrial revolution. We first looks at a larger wooden loom, this time with a shuttle taking the weft back and forth instead of a person (much cheaper!). Then we looked at the power loom – a huge metal loom! It was about 10 times faster than the previous loom and very noisy! We learnt that the workers would’ve had to lip read and even went deaf due to the noise level! This one was powered by electricity, but we learnt that it would’ve originally been powered by water or steam.

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We had a really interesting trip and learnt lots about our local industry!

 

The Black Country Living Museum

September 25th, 2016

On September 20th, the Owls visited the Black Country Living Museum to enrich our learning about industry in and around Avening. It was a great opportunity to see how different industry was outside of Avening in the Victorian era.

There were lots of things to see and do – so much so, I don’t think we all managed to see everything! We had an amazing time and everyone really enjoyed their experience (especially the Victorian-style school lesson we had! A few of the girls and I may have been told off for wearing nail varnish…)

Here are just a few snaps of our visit. The whole gallery will be available on the school website soon.

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Forest School 9th May

May 20th, 2016

We have been working our brains even harder than usual in the Owls over the last week as we have been taking our SATs! So when we found out that it was our turn for forest school, we were all delighted!

To begin the session, we looked at a couple of different knots. Some were trickier than others!

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This time, Carrie gave us lots of options and made sure that anyone who hadn’t been able to work with fire in the previous sessions were able to have a go. Some of us made fires, some of us used willow to do some weaving to make lots of creative things, and some of us even made some clay models!

Here are some pictures of our activities:

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We all really enjoyed our session (thank you Carrie!) and were even more delighted when  we realised we also got hot chocolate at the end!

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Mayan Food

May 20th, 2016

Due to the Spring term was coming to an end, it meant an end to possibly our favourite topic this year – Mexico! We really enjoyed learning all about Mexico, especially the Maya culture. To bring our topic to a close, we had a go at making some traditional Mayan food.

In groups, we measured out all of our ingredients to make enough corn tortillas. Some of us were reluctant at first, but we had great fun mixing it all together with our hands!

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Once we were happy that they were flat enough, we took them over to be fried.

Once they were all done, we sat down to eat them (the salsa wasn’t strictly Mayan, but it was yummy!). We also got the chance to try a traditional Mayan hot chocolate. It wasn’t quite what we were expecting – cinnamon and chilli powder were amongst the ingredients! Some of us weren’t so keen on it (including the Teacher and Teaching Assistants!) but everyone enjoyed trying it.

Mayan Day

March 22nd, 2016

On 10th March, we were joined by a lady from Creative History to immerse us in the Maya culture.

We began the day by looking at some different items linked with the Maya and how they used to live. We saw genuine artifacts (1300 years old!), food they will have eaten and lots more.

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Once we had all had a good look, Patricia talked to us about what the different things would’ve been used for and we worked together to split them into a number of different categories, including: household, leisure, commerce and food. It was really interesting to think about the day to day life of the Maya and what they would’ve been doing all those years ago.

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Later in the day, we played a settlement game. This involved looking at the different types of building the Maya would have in a village and designing our own little village.

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We then put all of our settlements together to build a big town. We talked about how the different areas of the town would’ve been richer or poorer, depending on the type and amount of land they had. We also put in a number of roads between villages – the more roads to and from the village, the more people would pass through it and spend their money.

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After break time, we learnt to write our names in Maya hieroglyphics. This was really tricky but very interesting!

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Towards the end of the day, we looked in more detail at a number of the objects we had discussed earlier in the day. We analysed thee objects by thinking about what we knew about them, what we may have assumed about them and any links between these ideas. It really got us thinking

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To finish the day, we played a board game all about the life and death of the Maya culture. We also learnt a bit more about why the Maya people died out, which turned out to be a lot about the weather! A severe drought meant farming was impossible – without farming they were unable to survive.

It was a great way to end our brilliant topic and we learnt lots!


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